8 Things Your Home Inspector Will Not Want You To Know

8 Things Your Home Inspector Will Not Want You To Know

You can avoid unexpected repair costs by having a home inspection done before you purchase a house. A qualified Raleigh home inspector can save you money over the long term. Many banks and other lending institutions will require that an inspection be done before you buy a house. These are the top 10 things home inspectors won’t tell you about home inspections.

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If we miss something, we are not responsible

Even the most skilled home inspectors make mistakes. A home inspector’s liability typically exceeds the cost of the inspection. This means that you may be responsible for thousands of dollars if the inspector overlooks significant issues. You can be sure that an inspector nearby Raleigh will cover you with “Mistakes & Omissions” coverage. These policies provide additional protection for inspectors who overlook a damaged roof or furnace in its final stages You can avoid unexpected repair costs by having a home inspection done before you purchase a house. A qualified home inspector in Raleigh can save you money over the long term. Many banks and other lending institutions will require that an inspection be done before you buy a house. These are the top 10 things home inspectors won’t tell you about home inspections.

Your Repair Work is Not Our Business

Home inspectors hired to fix repair defects will likely find more flaws than those who just perform an inspection. Although most home inspectors can handle both tasks and maintain an ethical standard, it’s possible to meet a less scrupulous one. The American Society of Home Inspectors prohibits members from soliciting repairs based on inspection results.

We are focused on the house, not the ground

Your home inspector will only be looking at your house and not its surroundings, as their title implies. The inspector will not see problems outside the house, so the buyer is more vulnerable to outbuildings and fences. These elements can be a significant expense and cause major headaches if they become damaged or unstable.

Home inspectors don’t usually inspect sheds or fencing. They also won’t inspect underground pipes or septic tanks, which can be expensive to replace or repair. You should include any outbuildings and other outdoor features in your home inspection checklist if you consider buying them. Consider hiring another inspector who is more familiar with this type of work if your inspector refuses to cooperate or feels unqualified to inspect these structures.

We won’t be climbing on your roof

You may be surprised to find out that home inspectors are not required to climb on top of the roof to inspect it. Even the American Society of Home Inspectors (the industry leader in home inspections) does not recommend a specific method for roof inspections. The American Society of Home Inspectors only requires members to “observe” the roof. However, individual inspectors can determine which way is best for each house—

My best source for clients is my real estate agent

A home inspector inspects the windows. Real estate agents often recommend Home inspectors. It may not be in your best interests to follow your agent’s advice as many home inspectors depend on them for referrals Home inspectors are well aware that flaws can reduce the price or even terminate a deal. Some home inspectors may be too naïve to spot potential problems and save money.

ou can protect yourself by selecting a home inspector that is entirely independent of your real estate agent. You can be sure that both professionals will look out for your best interests and not those of their clients. If you feel confident in your agent’s abilities, give their recommendations a try. Before you sign a deal, make sure that you have thoroughly vetted each inspector.

We may not have as much training as you do

Nearly a third of all U.S. states do not have any training or certification programs for housing inspectors. Many of those that have home inspector certification or training programs often have very loose requirements. A home inspector might have as much experience in assessing the condition of a house as you do. Most home inspections don’t require any digging beyond the surface. While an inspector might be able to peel off the edge of a rug to inspect the subfloor, he will not do the same with ceramic tiles or items concealed in walls and ceilings. Unscrupulous homeowners might use paint or other materials to hide water damages to make their job easier. Although there is no way to avoid these risks, an experienced home inspector can help you get as much information as you need to make your decision on the purchase.

Your House Might Not Meet Code

Home inspectors generally are not responsible for checking that the home is code compliant [source: Scherzer, Andrews]. This could mean that the home’s previous owner might have made outdated or unapproved renovations. Avoid inexperienced inspectors. Instead, look for certified professionals from a respected organization in the home inspection industry. For membership in the American Society of Home Inspectors, applicants must inspect 250 homes. The International Association of Certified Home Inspectors has similar requirements [source: Solomon].

Home inspections may not reveal the biggest dangers in your home

Most home inspectors are excellent at identifying problems in a home’s structure and systems. However, more severe problems may slip through the cracks. Home inspections do not usually cover asbestos, lead, mold, and other dangers. Herman Inspectors in many states require special licensing and training to handle these kinds of problems. The average home inspector cannot detect asbestos and lead. Find a home inspector that is able and willing to deal with asbestos tile or lead paint if you have concerns. You may need to hire a specialist depending on your location to deal with these hazardous conditions. This will allow your home inspector to concentrate on the rest.

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